Falling in Love with Vinal.

This week we are thrilled to bring you treats from Sarah Murphy at Vinal Bakery.  We love both Sarah and the English Muffins she bakes. For these English Muffins it doesn't matter if you toast them, grill them or make English Muffin Pizza for breakfast - just get them in your face. They're amazing.  Here's a bit more on Sarah and Vinal Bakery:

Vinal Bakery creates baked goods highlighting the local flavors and traditions of New England. Vinal is just getting its start as a weekly pop up featuring English muffins every Tuesday and Wednesday at Bagelsaurus in Porter Square, where owner/pastry chef Sarah Murphy works as a baker. Her pastry experience includes six years at Flour Bakery + Cafe, as well as time in the kitchens of Somerville favorites Sarma and 3 Little Figs. Her New England roots inspired her to start a New England focused bakery. She grew up in rural New Hampshire on the top of Birch Hill, where she spent her early days begrudgingly collecting eggs from the family’s chicken coop and happily stealing bites of her mom’s freshly baked bread. More info at vinalbakery.com and on Instagram and Twitter @vinalbakery


WHAT'S IN THE BAG?

HALF SHARE

Protein and Dairy - Sweet Italian Ground Sausage from Feather Brook Farms; 2- year aged Cheddar from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies - Certified Organic Cabbage, Green Leaf Lettuce, Carrots, Sweet Yellow Onions from Brookford Farm; Roma Tomatoes from Kimball Fruit Farm
Grains - Multigrain English Muffins from Vinal Bakery
Special Treat - Sea Salt Chocolate Chip Cookies from Vinal Bakery

For the Pescatarians: Gray Sole (caught YESTERDAY) from Chatham, MA from Red's Best 

For the Vegetarians and Pescatarians: We have vegan "pulled pork" for you from the Plant Deli. Chef Charles Christiansen used to be a competitive Pit Master (with real meat!) before he became a vegan. This is in addition to your share, and we would love to hear what you think!

WHOLE SHARE

Protein and Dairy - Sweet Italian Ground Sausage and Eggs from Feather Brook Farms; Bacon, Fresh Churned Butter and 2- year aged Cheddar from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies - Certified Organic Cabbage, Green Leaf Lettuce, Carrots, Sweet Yellow Onions from Brookford Farm; Roma Tomatoes, Macintosh Apples and Celery from Kimball Fruit Farm
Grains - Multigrain English Muffins from Vinal Bakery
Special Treats -Sea Salt Chocolate Chip Cookies from Vinal Bakery and Jar of Local Honey
  RECIPES

Tim and Erin both grew up having cabbage rolls, or galumpkis, for dinner and loving them. Erin called to bug her Mom for a few recipes and she sent some ideas, below. Nothing says "Family Dinner" more than Recipes from Mom.

Unstuffed Cabbage Rolls: The recipe for the traditional Polish Galumpki is a bit time intensive and requires a few things from the Pantry. The Unstuffed Rolls Mom prefers hold all the flavor in about half the time. Though it calls for traditional ground beef, the Sweet Italian Grind from Feather Brook Farms will be super tasty.

Crack Slaw: Wait, what? Crack Slaw? Yes. This is a recipe from Mom. She said those two words together. As disturbing as that was, the dish is incredible. It asks you to use Cole Slaw mix; essentially cut up cabbage and carrots. We don't love old, dry, flavorless mixes - so we gave you the fresh stuff. Another perfect dish for lunch all week, IF there are any leftovers.

Sausage and Cabbage Soup:  Simple and perfect for lunch all week. 

Carrot Soup: Here's a perfectly simple carrot soup. However, the carrot soup is a great example of how pureed veggies are a blank canvas for anything. If you have coconut milk and curry, go for an Indian flavor. If you have paprika and red pepper or kale or other greens, add a kick to it. Have fun, this is an easy thing to experiment with as we dive into Fall.


TIPS AND TRICKS 

Hoarding the Parmesan Rind: 
Whether we want to admit it or not, soup season is upon us. A great trick for a lot of soups is throwing in a parmesan cheese rind to add a nice depth and fatty flavor to the broth. If you have a few rinds, keep them in the freezer until you are ready to use - it keeps that pesky mold at bay. 

Melissa Clark at the New York Times tell us what's up:

"What I have done in the  past is to plop a piece of rind into soups or stews as they simmer. This works with any kind of slow-cooked dish that would taste good with a sprinkle of Parmesan on top; for instance, minestrone, split pea, tomato, lentil and corn chowder. Sometimes the cheese rind simply dissolves into the soup, but if it doesn’t, just fish it out with a slotted spoon before serving. It will add a nice umami complexity to the mix.

It’s a great, thrifty way to use the whole piece of cheese you bring home from the store -– nose-to-tail eating for the cheese-loving set."