Winter is coming.

The seasons they are a-changin'. That crisp little edge to the air definitely turned to a bite in the past week and cold fronts are sneaking up on us. For us that means scarves and pom-pom hats, for our produce the change is a little more serious. Our more fragile summer veggies like lettuce, tomatoes and fruit can't handle the frost. We've transitioned to their more robust counterparts, like squash, beets and parsnips for the season. 

These beautiful Chestnut Mushrooms from MycoTerra, pictured above, are ready to go all season long. According to Julia at MycoTerra: " Chestnuts are an attractive mushroom having a pleasant nutty flavor with peppery hints, not spicy but a nice seasoned flavor."  

As the bounty of summer fruit and vegetables shifts to a hardier fall crop, we will still bring you a beautiful array of local meat, fish, cheese, grains, and yes produce, all through the winter. 

 

WHAT'S IN THE BAG?

HALF SHARE

Protein and Dairy - Fresh-caught Haddock and Bay Scallops from Red's Best; Eggs from Feather Brook Farms
Fruits and Veggies - Chestnut Mushrooms from MycoTerra Farm; Certified Organic Acorn Squash, Spinach, Green Leeks from Brookford Farm; Bosc Pears from Kimball Fruit Farm
Grains - Spinach Gemelli from Nella Pasta
Special Treat - Donut Holes from Union Square Donuts
 

WHOLE SHARE

Protein and Dairy - Fresh-caught Haddock and Bay Scallops from Red's Best; Chicken Breast and Eggs from Feather Brook Farms; Maple Greek Yogurt from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies - Chestnut Mushrooms from MycoTerra Farm; Certified Organic Acorn Squash, Broccoli Crowns, Spinach, Green Leeks from Brookford Farm; Bosc Pears and Brussels Sprouts from Kimball Fruit Farm
Grains - Spinach Gemelli from Nella Pasta
Special Treats - Donut Holes from Union Square Donuts
  RECIPES

Bay Scallops: Scallops are the diamonds of the ocean. We love to include them when we can get our hands on them from Red's. They are simple to cook, with the only rule being don't OVER cook. They are smaller than sea scallops and require about 60-90 seconds at most per side on the heat. Its a good rule to have everything else done first, then move onto the scallops.

Braised Leeks: Good Ole Martha calls for a half cup of dry white here as a part of the braising liquid.
If you don't keep wine in the house, or maybe you drank it all (no judgement here) you can use more broth or water and a little more butter.

Haddock with Ritz Cracker Topping: Are Ritz Crackers local? Of course they aren't but they are SUPER delicious. If you happen to have a sleeve of crackers lying around, it makes for a great topping. Butter and breadcrumbs will also to the trick. Or just a simple roast with olive oil and the spices of your choice.

Mushroom Pasta: Don't throw away your pasta water! It sounds insane but that water is a great thickening agent for your sauce. By using a bit of the starchy water you help bind sauce, making it thicker and easier to coat the pasta with. Also, it's FREE. You were already going to throw it away, may as well make it work for you twice. Add fresh herbs if you have them, garlic if you love it, ground meat if you have some around. It will also accommodate veggies you have any kicking around in the fridge. Last week's kale? Sure. Wilting onions? Get 'em in there.

Oven Roasted Acorn Squash: Its an intimidating looking vegetable, but all it asks for is a little oil, salt and pepper and some time in a toasty oven.


TIPS AND TRICKS 

Pickling Vegetables is no Big Dill:
We have talked about pickling here before, and it bears repeating as we ramp up for the winter months. Pickling and canning are one of the best ways to make summer and fall vegetables last through the winter.

You can quick pickle just about any vegetable to add a sharp bite to a meal. Beans, Carrots, Pearl Onions and Beets really take well to a pickling brine. If you have extra veggies lying around, try this guide from Kitchn for the A-Z on quick pickling.