Dinner and a Movie

Collaborating with Vagrants
This photo is just a little sneak peak of the video we are making with Dustin and Winston from Vagrants. These guys are amazing! They are highlighting the origin of Family Dinner products from farm to plate. We visited Luke and his family at Brookford Farm and spent yesterday on set chopping fresh organic vegetables. We can't wait to share the finished video with you. Stay tuned!


WHAT'S IN THE BAG?

HALF SHARE

Protein and Dairy - Heritage Pork Chops and Eggs from Feather Brook Farms
Fruits and Veggies - Bunch of Carrots, Potatoes and Green Kale from Brookford Farm; Oyster Mushrooms from Mycoterra Farm; Peaches from Kimball Fruit Farm
Grains - Brioche Pullman Loaf from Iggy's Bakery
Special Treat - Pecan Rolls from Iggy's Bakery

WHOLE SHARE

Protein and Dairy - Heritage Pork Chops and Eggs from Feather Brook Farms; Breakfast Sausage and Brie from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies - Bunch of Carrots, Potatoes and Green Kale, Fennel Bulbs, Beets and Cantaloupe from Brookford Farm; Oyster Mushrooms from Mycoterra Farm; Peaches from Kimball Fruit Farm
Grains - Brioche Pullman Loaf from Iggy's Bakery
Special Treat - Pecan Rolls from Iggy's Bakery
RECIPES
Grilled Pork and Peaches: Combining pork chops and peaches may raise an eyebrow or two, but the acid and sweetness of the peaches cut nicely through the glorious fat of the pork. If adding fruit to protein isn't your thing, these beautiful chops are ready to stand up and be the star of any recipe.

Pork and Mushroom Gravy: If you have chicken broth on hand and a little bit of time, this one skillet full of warm, delicious comfort food. Serve it over rice, egg noodles or mop up the sauce with some Iggy's bread.

Brined Pork Chops with Fennel: Fennel has a light licorice flavor when eaten raw (shaved onto salads or on top of soups). When you roast the bulbs, they become delightfully sweet. Brining is not required but contributes an additional juiciness to the meat. 

Roasted Carrots and Potatoes: We prep these first and get them in the oven while we set up the rest of the meal. They take a while, but the slow roast is worth it.  Add any spices or herbs you have on hand.  We like to toss a generous pat of butter on at the end and sprinkle another pinch of salt. Mixing a tablespoon of dijon in at the end could also pair nicely with the potatoes and pork.


TIPS AND TRICKS 

Scrambled Eggs: Don't Rush a Good Thing.

A good scrambled egg is a thing of humble beauty. Eggs are cheap and incredibly versatile but they are also sometimes finicky and require attention. A perfect scramble keeps the egg light and fluffy by cooking slowly over low heat. These are a far cry from the flat, tough eggs that cook in 90 seconds at your local diner. The Spruce has a great guide to the perfect egg, complete with helpful hints (for God's sake don't stir them too much!) and a video to guide you along. Check it out, your Sunday morning will thank you.